Skip To The Main Content
Menu
Search

In This Section

Small Firm or Solo Practice includes many different areas of practice, including criminal law, education law, elder law, family law, immigration law, and tax law. Lawyers must be trained not only in the area of law relevant to the field, but in the lawyering skills needed for that area such as client counseling, litigation, and negotiation.

Solo Practice Career Path Resources

Solo Practice Faculty

Solo Practice Path View

  • Pathway

    Business Law Pathway / Solo Practice

    Business Law is one of the areas included in our Small Firm or Solo Practice training. The Business Law Pathway provides a road map for students interested in pursuing a career in several different contexts.

    Learn about New England Law courses in this area of law by reviewing our Business Law Pathway.

  • Pathway

    Civil Litigation Pathway / Solo Practice

    Civil Litigation is one of the areas included in our Small Firm or Solo Practice training. Civil litigation involves representing parties in disputes in state and federal court, in administrative tribunals and, increasingly, in arbitration and mediation.

    Learn about New England Law courses in this area of law by reviewing our Civil Litigation Pathway.

  • Pathway

    Criminal Law Pathway / Solo Practice

    Criminal Law is one of the areas included in our Small Firm or Solo Practice training. Criminal law attorneys often work as state or federal prosecutors, public defenders, private defense attorneys, business counselors, and judges.

    Learn about New England Law courses in this area of law by reviewing our Criminal Law Pathway.

  • Pathway

    Elder Law Pathway / Solo Practice

    Elder Law is one of the areas included in our Small Firm or Solo Practice training. Many elder law attorneys focus on helping clients obtain public benefits (usually Medicaid) to pay for long-term care. In addition, elder law attorneys often prepare legal documents for families to help them prepare for incapacity, such as durable powers of attorney and health care proxies to nominate surrogates in case they were later needed.

    Learn about New England Law courses in this area of law by reviewing our Elder Law Pathway.

  • Pathway

    Family Law Pathway / Solo Practice

    Family Law is one of the areas included in our Small Firm or Solo Practice training. Family lawyers handle divorce, represent children in custody matters, and can specialize in family affairs for nontraditional families, in adoption or reproductive law, or in paternity and child-support issues.

    Learn about New England Law courses in this area of law by reviewing our Family Law Pathway.

  • Pathway

    Immigration Law Pathway / Solo Practice

    Immigration law is one of the areas included in our Small Firm or Solo Practice training. Immigration lawyers represent people attempting to obtain visas, avoid deportation, or gain lawful permanent residence.

    Learn about New England Law courses in this area of law by reviewing our Immigration Law Pathway.

  • Pathway

    Real Estate Pathway / Solo Practice

    Real Estate law is one of the areas included in our Small Firm or Solo Practice training. Real Estate law is a broad course of study that includes transactions and permitting, as well as constitutional principles, statutory tools, and the fundamentals of agency practice.

    Learn about New England Law courses in this area of law by reviewing our Real Estate Law Pathway.

  • Pathway

    Tax Law Pathway / Solo Practice

    Tax Law is one of the areas included in our Small Firm or Solo Practice training. Tax law practice can encompass both tax planning and tax litigation.

    Learn about New England Law courses in this area of law by reviewing our Tax Law Pathway.

  • Pathway

    Trusts and Estates Pathway / Solo Practice

    Trusts and estate law is one of the areas included in our Small Firm or Solo Practice training. Estate planning lawyers help clients adopt legal strategies to transfer their property interests to succeeding generations.

    Learn about New England Law courses in this area of law by reviewing our Trusts and Estates Pathway.

  • Core Course

    Law Practice Management

    2 Credit (Professional Skills)

    Law Practice Management teaches students how to set up and run a small law firm or a solo practice; however, the skills and lessons learned in the class are transferable to any law practice, large or small. The class focuses on what is needed to launch your practice, how to generate business, how to establish a fee structure, how to actually handle the substantive work, how to manage clients, how to deal with opposing counsel, and how to fire a client. The class also discusses law firm economics, which is critical to understand, whether you are hanging your own shingle or working for someone else. Ethical considerations and malpractice traps in the context of the day-to-day practice of law are weekly themes. Additional elements of a law practice that are examined include 1) forming a business plan; 2) incorporation/partnership, employment/independent contracts; 3) insurance; 4) tax liabilities, annual and other filings and deposits, IOLTA; 5) space; 6) equipment; 7) management; 8) rainmaking and networking; 9) computer software; 10) banking: client funds, trust accounts, operating accounts, conveyancing accounts, IOLTA requirements; and 11) marketing and advertising. Former and current practitioners are guest lecturers, and in the past, they have included a disbarred lawyer to speak of his ethical missteps, bar counsel from the Office of Bar Counsel, a panel of seasoned practitioners, representatives from LOMAP and LCL. The course also involves a "shadowing" program, where students are matched with local practitioners based upon substantive law and geography. Each student meets with a local practitioner to discuss his or her practice and start to build the student's network. Please check the most recent course registration information to determine if this course meets the Experiential Education/Professional Skills requirement.

  • Core Course

    Law and Ethics of Lawyering

    3 Credit (Required)

    Examines the legal and ethical issues that practicing lawyers face regularly as they perform their unique, and often conflicting, responsibilities as representatives of clients, public citizens, and officers of the legal system. Particular attention is given to the laws regulating lawyer conduct, including common law standards, statutes, and formal rules of professional conduct. In addition, lawyers' legal duties are examined in light of concepts of ethical individual behavior, and the history, values, and goals of the legal profession. Ethics is scheduled as a required, second-year day course offered in the spring semester and as a required, third-year evening course offered in the fall semester.

  • Recommended Course

    Administrative Law

    3 Credit (Elective)

    This course is designed for students interested in regulatory law and those who seek additional coverage of pertinent constitutional law topics. Coverage includes the sources and nature of agency authority, agency rule making and adjudication, and judicial review of agency action. Constitutional issues addressed include the interplay of power among the three federal branches, procedural due process, and justiciability issues such as standing, ripeness, and mootness. Special emphasis is placed on the federal Administrative Procedure Act; state analogs may be studied as well. Attention also may be given to the internal functioning of typical administrative bodies and to the relationship between regulators and the regulated community.

  • Recommended Course

    Business Organizations

    3 Credit (Elective)

    Examines the similarities and differences among various types of business organizations (sole proprietorships, partnerships, corporations, and limited liability companies). Important issues studied include organization and formation requirements; roles, responsibilities, and potential liabilities of persons acting on behalf of the business organization and/or owning the business organization; the procedures and most frequent grounds for litigation involving business organizations; corporate social responsibility; and a brief introduction to the law of securities regulation and corporate control.

  • Recommended Course

    Family Law

    3 Credit (Elective)

    Surveys many legal problems of the family. Students taking this course will learn about the effect of the constitution on reproductive activity and family formation and structure. They also will learn about procedures for family dissolution, custody, and support, regardless of whether there has been a marriage or not. In addition, students will learn about the various ways in which members of families can use contracts to create their own relations and the settings in which the state does not permit self-determination. Finally, the course explores the lawyer's role in family counseling and litigation. One or more written exercises are sometimes required during the course, in addition to a final examination.

  • Recommended Course

    Lawyering Process

    6, 4, or 3 Credit (Clinic)

    This one-semester course serves as an introduction to civil litigation. Students attend a 2-hour weekly class and 16 hours per week (8 hours or 5 hours, respectively, for the 4- and 3-credit version open to part-time students only), working on civil cases through the Clinical Law Office or other legal services offices, such as Greater-Boston Legal Services. Students represent clients under Rule 3:03 of the Supreme Judicial Court, the student practice rule, and assume responsibility for all phases of each case they handle. Students meets on a weekly basis with their assigned supervisor to discuss progress and strategy on the student's cases, and are responsible for handling cases until the end of the examination period. The major objective of the course is to develop a conceptual framework within which students can understand and evaluate their own experience in practice, both during the course and in future practice. The skills studied include client interviewing, case planning, investigation/discovery, client counseling, negotiation, argument, and the presentation of evidence. In addition to providing the opportunity to develop skills, the course examines institutional and ethical problems that arise in the student's practice. Written work includes short papers and an examination. Prerequisites/corequisites include Evidence or Trial Practice. This course satisfies the Experiential Education/Professional Skills Requirement.

  • Recommended Course

    Personal Income Tax

    3 Credit (Elective)

    This course covers the Internal Revenue Code provisions applicable to the tax treatment of individual taxpayers. Students also will study tax policy, case law, and the tax doctrines and principles applicable to the determination of an individual's taxable income. This course provides the basic structure for understanding and interpreting the Internal Revenue Code, and serves as a foundation for upper-level tax and business-related law school courses.

    Areas of coverage includes: gross income; the tax consequences of property transactions; property acquired by gift, bequest, devise, or inheritance; scholarships, prizes, and awards; life insurance and annuities; discharge of indebtedness; personal injury damages; fringe benefits; divorce; and deductions related to a trade or business or profit-seeking activity.

    When offered as a distance-learning course, there will be required weekly readings from the casebook and online statutory and regulatory sources, regular mini-lectures on prerecorded video accompanied by PowerPoint slides, discussion forums to which students must make posts each week, and weekly quizzes. All course material other than the casebook will be accessible by any computing device through an Internet connection. While most of the course will be asynchronous, opportunities will be presented for synchronous digital chat. In addition to posing questions and providing guidance on the discussion boards and through the video lectures, the professor will be available throughout the course by e-mail, conference call, or live chat. Grading will be based on participation in the forums (including a qualitative component), performance on quizzes, and a final "open-book" examination.

  • Recommended Course

    Wills, Estates, and Trusts I

    3 Credit (Elective)

    This course is designed to give the student a grounding in the general law relating to donative transfers of property interests taking place at death. It covers intestate succession, wills laws, nonprobate transfers, and some trust laws. It is not jurisdiction-specific; instead, it focuses on majority and minority rules and trends in the law. Jurisdictional comparisons often will be made.

    When offered as a distance learning course, there will be required weekly readings from the casebook, regular mini-lectures on prerecorded video accompanied by PowerPoint slides, discussion forums to which students must make posts each week, and weekly assessments, including quizzes. All course material other than the casebook will be accessible by any computing device through an Internet connection. While most of the course will be asynchronous, opportunities will be presented for synchronous digital chat. In addition to posing questions and providing guidance on the discussion boards and through the video lectures, the professor will be available throughout the course by e-mail, telephone, in-person at New England Law Boston, and/or via Skype. Grading will be based on participation in the forums (including a qualitative component), performance on quizzes, and a final "open-book" examination.

  • Other Course

    Law and the Elderly

    2 or 3 Credit (Elective)

    This class presents a broad overview of the legal and policy questions relating to aging individuals and an older society. As our elderly population continues to grow faster than the population as a whole, the legal profession must be prepared to address the wide range of legal issues that particularly affect the elderly. Topics that are explored include how the elderly live when they retire and their income drops, health-care options and access to care, housing alternatives when a person ages and becomes frail, and long-term care policies. Students also study health-care decision making, planning for incapacity, legal considerations when individuals can no longer make decisions for themselves, and elder abuse, neglect, and financial exploitation. This course involves frequent use of simulations, and problem-solving extrapolated from actual situations encountered by elderly clients. Please check the most recent course registration information to determine if this course meets the Experiential Education/Professional Skills requirement.

  • Other Course

    Workers’ Compensation

    2 Credit (Elective)

    Examines the theory and practice of workers' compensation systems and their development through case law and statute reform, from A (assaults) to Z (zookeeper attacks).

    This course may be offered every other year.

  • Other Course

    Landlord-Tenant Law

    2 Credit (Elective)

    This class examines the relationship between property owners and their lessees. We will take an in-depth look at the residential process, while touching on aspects of the commercial relationship. The class will take you through the history of the landlord-tenant relationship, the creation of the tenancy, maintaining the tenancy, terminating the tenancy, and post-termination issues. Students will be required to not only understand and analyze the concepts of a tenancy, but to draft documents, such as leases and eviction documents/pleading. This class will provide students with the practical skills and knowledge needed for real-life practice. Students may choose the state they wish to practice in as the focus for research and participation. Classes will be a combination of lectures, in-class discussions and role-playing, and a required court attendance. Students will be evaluated on class exercises, written work during the semester, class participation, and a final exam.

    This class may be offered every other year.

  • Other Course

    Alternative Dispute Resolution

    2 Credit (Professional Skills)

    This course focuses on alternative methods of dispute resolution, including negotiation, mediation, and arbitration. In-class simulations of fact patterns are used as a means of illustrating certain resolution methods. Please check the most recent course registration information to determine if this course meets the Experiential Education/Professional Skills requirements.

  • Other Course

    Negotiation

    3 Credit (Professional Skills)

    Explores the theory and the art of resolving conflict through negotiation. Various styles are presented for comparison and analysis. Students are urged to evaluate their own intuitive style and to experience others. Practical experience is achieved through one-on-one and group negotiations exercises. The theory of conflict, strategic choice, ethical issues, and the negotiator's dilemma are presented in a variety of substantive contexts. Please check the most recent course registration information to determine if this course meets the Experiential Education/Professional Skills requirement.

  • Other Course

    Refugee and Asylum Law

    2 Credit (Elective)

    The course will survey the relevant international laws and conventions governing refugees and asylum seekers, but the focus will be building the skills necessary to bring an asylum case in the United States. Each class will take students through one element of the complex categories available to asylum seekers (race, religion, nationality, political opinion, and social group) and review the points at which asylum law in the United States has intersected with politics in recent years (national security, international relations, immigration). Each class also will contain an exercise designed to prepare students to be practice-ready in preparing an asylum claim. Students should come away with understanding of the asylum law and process and be sufficiently prepared to bring an asylum claim.

    Please check the most recent course registration information to determine if this course meets the Experiential Education/Professional Skills requirements.

  • Other Course

    Trial Practice

    2 or 3 Credit (Professional Skills)

    This skills course is designed to prepare students for the trial phase of litigation. Although it presumes prior knowledge of the substantive areas of law covered during the first two years of law school, especially evidence, the course itself concentrates on trial procedure and the development of jury trial advocacy skills. Students conduct complete mock trials in which they participate as parties, witnesses, and counsel. Problems faced by students acting as counsel include jury selection, opening statements, closing arguments, examination of witnesses-including opinion testimony, offers of exhibits, objections to evidence, and impeachment of witnesses. Mock trial exercises are critiqued by the instructor and class members. Consideration also is given to client interviews, investigation, discovery, pleadings, pretrial motions, and the preservation of rights to appeal. Please check the most recent course registration information to determine if this course meets the Experiential Education/Professional Skills requirement.

  • Other Course

    Administrative Law Clinic

    2/3 Credit (Clinic)

    Placements inside agencies or in organizations or offices that work before agencies are within the broad scope of the clinic. Students in this clinical component spend 10 (2-credit) or 15 (3-credit) hours per week on fieldwork. Given the broad range of possible placements, students' experiences can range from acting as a law clerk to an administrative law judge or hearing officer to advocating before an agency. Students will submit weekly journals, describing and reflecting on their experiences in the field, and will meet in a series of seminars with the course instructor and/or the Clinical Director to explore the relationship between the principles covered in the substantive class and the students' fieldwork. NOTE: ELIGIBILITY FOR SOME PLACEMENTS IN THIS COURSE IS DEPENDENT ON SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION OF A BACKGROUND CHECK. This course satisfies the Experiential Education/Professional Skills Requirement.

  • Other Course

    Criminal Procedure II Clinic

    3 Credit (Clinic)

    This clinical component enables students to handle aspects of the actual prosecution or defense of misdemeanors in the state District Courts. Students spend 15 hours per week handling cases under the supervision of assistant district attorneys or public defenders. By court rule, this clinic is limited to students in their last year of law school. Students must keep at least one full day, and preferably two, clear for their fieldwork, since they must be available an entire day to handle cases. Students will submit weekly journals, describing and reflecting on their experiences in the field, and will meet in a series of seminars with the course instructor and/or the Clinical Director to explore the relationship between the principles covered in the substantive class and the students' fieldwork. NOTE: ELIGIBILITY FOR SOME PLACEMENTS IN THIS COURSE, AND FOR SJC RULE 3:03 CERTIFICATION, IS DEPENDENT ON SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION OF A BACKGROUND CHECK. This course satisfies the Experiential Education/Professional Skills Requirement.

  • Other Course

    Federal Courts Clinic

    2/3 Credit (Clinic)

    Students will be placed in the Civil Division of the US Attorney's Office in Boston and will be under the supervision of a designated assistant US attorney. Students will work with assistant US attorneys on a wide variety of matters that fall within the jurisdiction of the Civil Division. The bulk of the work will involve research and writing on litigation-related legal issues that are directly pertinent to the subjects covered in the Federal Courts class (e.g. justiciability and immunity defenses, government enforcement actions, civil rights litigation). Students will prepare memoranda and drafts of arguments to be included in briefs, may assist in discovery or case investigation, may attend court hearings, and will generally assist in the normal work of the office. Students will submit weekly journals, describing and reflecting on their experiences in the field, and will meet in a series of seminars with the course instructor and/or the Clinical Director to explore the relationship between the principles covered in the substantive class and the students' fieldwork. The US Attorney's Office only accepts students for the 15-hour (3-credit) version of this clinic. NOTE: ELIGIBILITY FOR THIS COURSE IS DEPENDENT ON SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION OF A BACKGROUND CHECK. Prerequisite/Corequisite FC379. This course satisfies the Experiential Education/Professional Skills Requirement.

  • Other Course

    Family Law Clinic

    2/3 Credit (Clinic)

    Students in this clinical component spend 10 (2-credit) or 15 (3-credit) hours a week in settings that expose them to the practice of family law. Most placements will be in settings such as legal services offices, including New England Law's in-house clinic, in which students will handle family law cases pursuant to SJC Rule 3:03, the student practice rule. Since most legal services offices take family law cases primarily where there are issues of domestic violence, the family law placements typically will expose students to issues covered in the Domestic Violence and Family Law courses. Settings beyond legal services offices will be appropriate placements as well, as long as the substantive work in the field will expose students to issues covered in the courses recognized as the corequisites/prerequisites. Students will submit weekly journals, describing and reflecting on their experiences in the field, and will meet in a series of seminars with the course instructor and/or the Clinical Director to explore the relationship between the principles covered in the substantive class and the students' fieldwork. Prerequisite/corequisites include Domestic Violence and Family Law. This course satisfies the Experiential Education/Professional Skills Requirement.

  • Other Course

    Government Lawyer Clinic

    4 Credit (Clinic)

    This clinical course gives students an opportunity to participate in and to analyze the work of a lawyer in a government setting. Participants will spend 12 hours per week working in the Massachusetts Attorney General's Office under the supervision of assistant attorneys general or another government agency. Students may assist with various aspects of litigation, such as research, investigation, pleadings, discovery, motions, trials, and appeals. Students must attend a weekly, two-hour class that will explore the skills required in representing the government as well as such policy issues as defining the "public interest" and the conflicts between representing the public and defending the government. NOTE: ELIGIBILITY FOR THIS COURSE IS DEPENDENT ON SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION OF A BACKGROUND CHECK. CONTACT PROFESSOR CARRIKER IF YOU HAVE QUESTIONS (727-2200 Ext. 2118). Prerequisites/corequisites include Evidence or Trial Practice. This course satisfies the Experiential Education/Professional Skills Requirement.

  • Other Course

    Health Law Clinic

    2/3 Credit (Clinic)

    Students in this clinical component will spend 10 (2-credit) or 15 (3-credit) hours per week working in a placement with legal work in the area of health law. Placements may include one or more hospitals, government agencies, legal services offices, and private law firms. Students will submit weekly journals, describing and reflecting on their experiences in the field, and will meet in a series of seminars with the course instructor and/or the Clinical Director to explore the relationship between the principles covered in the substantive class and the students' fieldwork. Students must have taken or be currently enrolled in at least one of the following: Health Care Law, Hospital Law, Mental Health Law, or Public Health Law. This course satisfies the Experiential Education/Professional Skills Requirement.

  • Other Course

    Immigration Law Clinic

    2/3 Credit (Clinic)

    Students in this clinical component will work in law offices or agencies that provide representation to aliens involved in proceedings before the INS or in court cases originating from such proceedings. Students will spend 10 (2-credit) or 15 (3-credit) hours per week in the field, assisting attorneys who are specialists in immigration law. Students will submit weekly journals, describing and reflecting on their experiences in the field, and will meet in a series of seminars with the course instructor and/or the Clinical Director to explore the relationship between the principles covered in the substantive class and the students' fieldwork. This course satisfies the Experiential Education/Professional Skills Requirement.

  • Other Course

    Land Use Law Clinic

    2/3 Credit (Clinic)

    Students in this clinical component spend 10 (2-credit) or 15 (3-credit) hours each week working primarily for suburban Boston city and town counsel offices, zoning boards, or private firms. Students will submit weekly journals, describing and reflecting on their experiences in the field, and will meet in a series of seminars with the course instructor and/or the Clinical Director to explore the relationship between the principles covered in the substantive class and the students' fieldwork. This course satisfies the Experiential Education/Professional Skills Requirement.

  • Other Course

    Mediation and Dispute Resolution Clinic

    2/3 Credit (Clinic)

    Students in this clinical component course will spend 10 (2-credit) or 15 (3-credit) hours per week in settings that expose them to various aspects of dispute resolution, mediation. Students will submit weekly journals, describing and reflecting on their experiences in the field, and will meet in a series of seminars with the course instructor and/or the Clinical Director to explore the relationship between the principles covered in the substantive class and the students' fieldwork. Prerequisites/corequisites include Alternative Dispute Resolution, Mediation, or Negotiation. This course satisfies the Experiential Education/Professional Skills Requirement.

  • Other Course

    Massachusetts Practice Clinic

    2/3 Credit (Clinic)

    Students in this clinical component will spend 10 (2-credit) or 15 (3-credit) hours per week initially in the Suffolk County Superior Court Clerk's Office assisting the clerks. After approximately three weeks, students will be assigned to Superior Court judges in Suffolk County, where they will work as law interns for the balance of the semester. SINCE STUDENTS WILL WORK WITH JUDGES, ALL FIELDWORK FOR THEIR CLINIC MUST BE SCHEDULED MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY, BETWEEN 10:00 A.M AND 4:30 P.M., IN BLOCKS OF TIME NO SMALLER THAN 3 HOURS AND NO LONGER THAN 7 HOURS. Students will submit weekly journals, describing and reflecting on their experiences in the field, and will meet in a series of seminars with the course instructor and/or the Clinical Director to explore the relationship between the principles covered in the substantive class and the students' fieldwork. This course satisfies the Experiential Education/Professional Skills Requirement.

  • Other Course

    Public Interest Law Seminar / Clinic

    3, 4, or 5 Credit (Clinic)

    This one-semester package includes both a clinical course and seminar. Students will spend 5 (1-credit), 10 (2-credit), or 15 (3-credit) hours per week in their fieldwork, depending on the number of credits for the clinical component portion. In addition, all students will attend a weekly, 2-hour seminar (2 credits). The total package will therefore be offered for 3, 4, or 5 credits, with the 3-credit package offered only to Evening and Special Part-Time Program students. For the clinical component, the core placements will include the New England Law Clinical Law Office and off-site placements, such as Greater-Boston Legal Services, where students will handle civil cases. Students will be practicing under Rule 3:03 of the Supreme Judicial Court, typically representing indigent clients. An explicit goal of this course is to provide our students with direct experience providing "legal services for the benefit of persons of limited means." See MASS. R PROF. CONDUCT R. 6.1. Placements in governmental agencies will not be the focus of this clinic, since the placements in other clinical courses are so heavily weighted toward the government sector (e.g. Government Lawyer, Tax Clinic, Administrative Law Clinic, Criminal Procedure II Clinic, Federal Courts Clinic). The seminar portion of the course will focus on public interest law and the public interest lawyer. Classes, or units of classes, will include issues such as: introduction to substantive areas of public interest law (e.g., family law, housing law, government benefits); ethics (e.g. issues affecting public interest lawyers, regulation of the profession and delivery of legal services); clients (unmet legal needs, and issues of poverty, race and gender); the courts (dispensing justice to persons of limited means); and legal education (the role of law schools in preparing lawyers for the practice). Issues from the students' fieldwork will be incorporated into the classes, to strengthen the connections between classroom and fieldwork, as well as theory and practice.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Evidence or Trial Practice.

    This course satisfies the Experiential Education/Professional Skills Requirement.

  • Other Course

    Tax Clinic

    3 Credit (Clinic)

    This course places students at the Appellate Tax Board of the Massachusetts Revenue Department, where they handle tax cases and issues for 10 hours per week. Students assist administrative law judges in deciding disputed tax cases by preparing bench memos and also assist the board's legal counsel in drafting decisions. In addition, students meet in a weekly class that explores issues raised by their cases, including the administration and enforcement of state and federal tax laws. Students also will gain very practical knowledge in areas of federal and state tax law, which is of particular importance to every practicing attorney. This course satisfies the Experiential Education/Professional Skills Requirement.